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friend, he and i have been together and political offices, a government responsibility for a very long time. more than three years. when he decided not to run again and my other colleague who was part of team north dakota was defeated, it was less rewarding for me personally to be here. less enjoyable for me to be here. i am sure that played a role. >> in your speech yesterday, you used the expression of the senate we efforts right yesterday, as the world's greatest deliberative body. do you think the public shares that perception? >> probably not. [laughter] we're efficient at producing results. -- deficient at producing results. what i also said yesterday was a there are problems here. the problems i believe are very clear is that we spend too much time trying to seek political advantage, too little time focused on solving the country's problems. i am sure that had a role in my decision as well. i really came here wanting to do big things. wanted to work on solving problems. there is been much less an emphasis on that lately and much more of an emphasis on how you get over on the oth
. the government gets the money from us. i do not see how they have the right to sit there and play politics with each other and try to make decisions that are going to just benefit them. maybe a small part of the population. this is the united states. we're supposed to be tried to help everybody. we cannot be scared of what is clear to happen to us when many people are barely able to meet their bills. they may have to be afraid of what is going to happen to them. what kind of government would do that to their people? they should try to make us feel calm. like we are really going to get something done. host: from crawford, indiana this morning. on twitter -- another tweet i want to read this morning -- jodi wrtes in -- we will be taking your calls all of this morning for this segment and the next segment on the "washington journal." we told you what was going on in the senate. here is "roll-call" newspaper and what is being prepped in the house today -- alan ota writes, the speaker made it clear -- that is what is going on in the house. let's go to charles on a republican line from maryland.
got medicaid payments by the government to help the state's struggling with their medicaid costs. $20 billion will able to spread across the states to help them because they were unable to meet the rising costs. in 2017, they're going to have a larger share of the costs. we need that is taken care of. they did not know what the cost was. they put a number in as a place holder and it looked like i was doing something for my state when i wasn't. i was trying to get it for all the states. that is what happened. i wanted to get it knocked out -- but if people wanted an opt out. the supreme court gave that. this got used against me as though i was trying to do something i should not have. i was not. the interesting thing is i was asked to do this by the nebraska governor. i did not get a thank you from another governor, who was from another state. >> during that time, you experienced the radio talk-show host circuit and the cable tv circuit. what was that time like and what do you think the echo chamber in american politics today does? >> it is a difficult thing to deal with. it is not jus
a denunciation of big government liberalism or big government programs. you can see his anti-communism is evolving, his cultural view is evolving. he has not yet gained or acquired the tax-cut philosophy which fit so nicely into his optimistic outlook of empowering individuals to determine their own lives. >> saturday night at 8:00 eastern, craig shirley on the political campaigns of ronald reagan, part of four days of american history tv, right through new year's day, on c- span3. >> you think of washington before the civil war. you think slavery was well entrenched. black people were miserable. that is not true at all. in washington, washington had about 30,000 people as a city. 12,000 of them were black. the majority free, no slaves. >> what led to the first race riots? jefferson morley recounts what happened, part of what today's through new year's day on c- span2's book tv. >> "washington journal" continues. host: damian paletta join us here at the table. thank you for joining us. this is the fourth time that congress has had a post- christmas lame duck session. what doe
-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- in -- i have 10 years left to go until medicare. i pay $620 a month for my health care. that is a lot of money. i would give that to the government and would usn't use t $100 or $200 a year. host: that is an important issue. we will focus more as the affordable care act t kicks in. for the suggestion -- thank you for the suggestion. the deficit is close to $16.4 trillion. this is part of the debate we will see at the start of the new congress. the so-called fiscal cliff was coined by ben bernanke. the story from "roll call." "it could be reached over this weekend." were heard from the house rules committee chairman yesterday. they are taking steps in advance to extend these tax cuts. a deal could be on the floor today if there is an agreement. from "the washington times" this morning. "offers fly, but still no agreement" is the headline. mitch mcconnell bypassed senator reid to speak directly to the vice president
or canceled. or to tell various agency the-- the t.s.a., f.a.a., all through the federal government, lay people off, this is real, because they seaport negotiations are not getting anywhere near a deal and they have to prepare for the cutting side of the fiscal cliff, not just the taxes. >> o'donnell: and, nancy, if there is no deal, what happens next on monday? >> reporter: essentially we move to plan b, where senates democrat introduce their own plan in the senate that caps the bush tax cuts ap at $250,000 or less, extends long-term unemployment benefits, maybe imposing spending cuts to push off the sequester for six months or a year and we see if the republicans allow a straight up-or-down votes that only requires 50 senators to vote yes or if we have to go to a 60-vote threshold. democrats think they can get the seven republicans they need-- they think they might be able to get up to 10 who have signaled they could go along with something like this. that's not the end of the road. even if it passes, it has to go to the house and that's a tricky road as well. >> o'donnell: let's turn
at this moment is not in effect. the french government and francois hollande says, it won't make any difference. we'll rewrite the law using new wording and we'll catch more people in the 75% tax rate net. heather: stuart varney, i know you have a lot of work to do today. it is a busy day financially. thank you. >> thank you. gregg: what will it mean if lawmakers fail to strike a deal? according to the tax policy center 90% of the americans would see a tax hike in 2013. 121 million people will be paying a whole lot more in payroll taxs. those are social security payroll taxs. families making between 40 and $65,000 a year will have to pay an extra two grand to the u.s. government. the more you make, boy, that number really accelerates. heather? heather: another devastating blow in the fiscal cliff crisis, this mess, will be to the military. $500 billion slashed from the pentagon budget that is raising serious concerns about our national security. chairman of the house armed services committee, california congressman, bruce mckeown will weigh in on the impact these cuts will v that is live in our
smaller increases to social security over time, why it would be a saving to the government. whether you like that or not it is actually not a terrible idea even though i'm going to get another bunch of tweets from people who said it is not terrible, may not be ideal. why are we having this conversation with a day and a half to go? 500-some-odd days ago they came one this concept of a sequester. they knew the fiscal cliff was coming. 12 years' notice we had these bush tax cuts were going to expire. these kind of discussions require air they require time they require debate and we are now having them. when john thune says he hopes that senator reid brings a bill to the floor and it is open to discussion and amendment, not today. not today. it's too late for that. make a deal and stop markets from going over the edge, stop this economy from going over the edge. they will ruin a good economy, martin this is ridiculous, irresponsible, disgusting behavior. >> you don't want to hear this kind of detailed conversation going on now? >> no. no. >> you want to get a deal done? >> forget t no more
who captured. what they campaigned against was spending money on government, that is what taxes are. got it? and that's hardball for now, thanks for being with us "the ed show" with ed schultz starts right now. >>> good evening, americans, welcome to the ed show. i'm michael eric dyson in for ed schultz. the president cuts his vacation short to come back to washington, d.c., meanwhile, house republicans are literally phoning it in, this is the ed show, and as ed would say, let's get to work. >> this is something within our capacity to solve. it doesn't take that much work, we just have to do the right thing. >> six days away from the fiscal cliff and there are real consequences to millions of americans if no deal is cut. congressman elijah cummings and ryan grim of the huffington post are here with the latest. a tea party giant stages a coupe with his own office. the details on dick armey's hostile takeover. the nra is catching heat from all directions. >> i don't think the nra is listening, i don't think they understand. >> georgetown university law professor, david cole on the gro
can move forward? >> well, first of all, we have to be able to govern. we have to have an adult conversation, getting people in the room who actually want to solve this problem. and i think it's very important to step back and see the fact that we have already -- there are three parts of this deficit reduction stool. we've already in the past two years passed $1.6 trillion in spending cuts. we've passed over $700 billion in savings in medicare through reforms like cutting back on overpayments to insurance companies. the one piece of this puzzle that we've not been able to get any support for is making sure that the wealthiest among us help solve this problem by being willing to pay a little bit more to be part of the solution. so we have sent a bill to the house back in july, bipartisan bill that says what -- everybody says they don't want middle-class families to have their taxes go up, well, fine. why don't we start with something we can agree on, which is that? and just pass that. why doesn't the house just pass that? but as we know, the speaker couldn't even pass his own pla
't he accepting it ne fuel? >> it would cause drawing up laws to govern what the pressure should do. this really was a question of the heart of all of this. how could you make sure that everybody was involvinged incluesing publishers that aren't to do so without the piece of legislation that would amount enemies of the system sucting to licensing. the law had to change. talks use similar language that would simply recognize an independent regulator in raw. this debate went for months and months and months. they were joined. it would billion far more something more owneress. that's what david cameron was addressing in some of of his concerns. how did it feel? >> we saw something rather by zard there. we heard from the two men, the prime minister and the deputy frimse. there were -- separation. one of those two men thinks new law is skential and the other not is not. >> in the backgrounds for a moment, you've got the last few months. will continue to cross party talks. but simultaneously you also god the crime city. try now that new regulator could be brought in into this new law if i
are again here like we were for the debt ceiling, like we were for the government shutdown. it is ridiculous that we are here because we want to be having a big discussion. we have all the facts in front of us. we know that there are people like you kwhof a position on taxes. we know there are others who have positions on other things. and our democracy is supposed to allow us to somehow come to together, to convene, to deliberate and to evolve some sort of a compromise. what response -- what responsibility do you think conservative republicans who have signed this pledge to grover norquist bear for us getting to where we are today? >> well, actually, let me defend grover for a second. >> sure. >> he actually has signed on to some kind of a deal. we're in a situation that if nothing happens taxes go up on everyone. so -- and then a guy like me doesn't want to see that happen obviously. look, i want to make one other point. even if we go over the so-called cliff, and i think cliff is a bad metaphor here, really kind of a slope. it's not like the world's going to come to an end january 1st or
shrinking the government, making the government do less are actually good things. >> right, i don't think there's any question about that. we know there's an element of the republican party, ron paul, rand paul being the most visible, who think the less government does, the better. now, in that vain, i've been struck. david wasserman at the "cook political report" crunched the numbers on this, that there are 234 house republicans. 15 of them, 15 represent districts that president obama carried in 2012. given that, and we were talking with kelly about the fact that this has to come through the house at some point, that republicans still control. is there any reason for, politically speaking -- >> absolutely, right. >> -- not good of the country speaking, but politically speaking, is there any reason for these guys to make a deal given that for 215 of them, the constituency they represent are mitt romney's? >> i think this is the problem. where most people follow a presidential election and don't realize what happens in each of the districts. what republicans have done a very good job of in
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
a dramatic decline in their payments from the government, and certainly, that we're not going to do the sequester. we cannot tolerate, ordinary people can't tolerate these kinds of cuts in programs. >> absolutely. congresswoman jan schakowsky, thank you so very much. >> thank you. >> remember to answer tonight's question there at the bottom of the screen and share your thoughts on twitter @edshow and on facebook. i want to know what you think. >>> coming up, this congress is on track to be the worst congress ever. that's right. "the huffington post" amanda turco and robert reich will join me. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former la
't have a dramatic decline in their payments from the government, and certainly, that we're not going to do the sequester. we cannot tolerate, ordinary people can't tolerate these kinds of cuts in programs. >> absolutely. congresswoman jan schakowsky, thank you so very much. >> thank you. >> remember to answer tonight's question there at the bottom of the screen and share your thoughts on twitter @edshow and on facebook. i want to know what you think. >>> coming up, this congress is on track to be the worst congress ever. that's right. "the huffington post" amanda turco and robert reich will join me. >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former labor secretary, robert reich, and amanda turco of "the huffington post." >>> then, chicago reaches the tragic milestone of 500 homicides in 2012. reverend jesse jackson will join me to discuss curbing gun violence in our cities. we'll be right back. >>> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thinning. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is t
our government is trying to do with the bickering and tearing each other down, tearing the country down. why in the world can these supposedly intelligent groups of men and women not get together to work out for the best interest of all concerned, all 330 billion americans, what is the best course to take? just take it. none of this squabbling. get together, folks. let's have some harmony in warrington. that is what we need. we need more on selfishness. a lot less ulterior motives. no more 2000 page bills that no one can understand. we do not need more of that crap in washington. we need some representation. get your act together. >> we are going next to minneapolis, minnesota. john, welcome. >> all of this gridlock going on right now, what is clearly evident to me is that the republican party has pure interests in mind. they're willing to touch medicare and social security, but not their own salaries, no steps against their own party to take the needs of the american people. how can you act together with a party that works purely for their own interests. my question is -- what can
communications are looked at by the government. people want amendments. unfortunately congress once again is acting at the last minute trying to renew something about to expire and there is probably not the time to do revisions that are necessary. that's a problem here. harris: because critics want this to be revised as you just put it. the white house doesn't. it wants it to pass the way it is. a lot of people are in favor of it because it is helping to keep us safe since there is homegrown terror in the united states and we need to find it. i want to if which have the words put it up on the screen. kentucky senator rand paul had this to say on the senate floor yesterday. and what he was basically saying is that this interferes and disputes the power of the fourth amendment. and that it needs to be changed. again, dan, you say we may not see any changes to it because the deadline is tuesday? >> it is really important to note that even the supporters of renewing acknowledge there needs to be reform. there needs to be more oversight. we need to know more how the fisa court works. we want m
" to postpone a government default. the government is on track to hit its borrowing limit on monday, he said with no prospect of congressional action to raise the limit. here now to help us unravel what's going on is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international. todd, welcome back. decode this for us. are the players privately as bleak about the prospects as their public statement suggests? >> not as bleak, margaret, but bleaker than they were even a week ago and that's not terribly encouraging. the president as you reported is flying back to washington last night and some members of congress are coming back earlier than others. there will be some meetings here, there have to be some meetings between the principals and the president. there are a couple of options in the last couple of days even though it seems like five days is terribly, terribly short. there shall bills floating out there to keep tax rates where they're at for people making $250,000 and below. that could slide around. there's a senate bill that floats around. there's the pres
, to pay for more government spending that doesn't help us with the deficit. and you hear members of congress, your republican colleagues who say, in my district, they don't want more spending. and that's how they see this money being spent. >> two things i would say. first of all, that is not the democratic position. no one that i know of is arguing that all of the increased revenue should go for increased spending nap simply isn't the case. by the way not having the sequester doesn't mean increased spending. it mean not having spending cuts. i voted against the idea of a sequester. i think it's not right way to do it. what the republicans want to do is spend more on defense. let me deal with this notion that republicans for cutting spending. you heard mitt romney criticize president obama because he's not spending enough on ships, which we don't need, and not staying long enough in the war zones. the republicans' view of spending is very particular one. secondly, as far as the american people are concerned, people in their districts, gee, if they represent districts in new jerse
to the federal budget, how big is the federal budget? how much money does the government take in? how much do we spend? how much is $167 trillion for the current debt? guest: spending this year will be $33.8 trillion. the deficit of about $1 trillion that is for fiscal 2013. that assumes that somehow the fiscal cliff doesn't happen and we don't reduce the deficit by $600 billion. national debt, about $16 billion , debt held by the public -- as a percentage it is getting up there. we've had it before. as we talked about two weeks ago it is not so much that the size of the debt it is how fast the debt is growing in comparison to the size of the economy. you don't want to pay off the debt but you want it to fall. host: how did we get to this point? why is the government spending so much and under this president, we've seen the debt go up $1 trillion each year over the last four years. where is it going? guest: there are two main ways to look at it. right now, we're still coming out of this economic crisis. so you have large debts for four years mainly because you have low revenues as people don't h
distract from what the country needs to do. we need to deal with our run-away government spending, the government is spending too much money. tax increases are not part of cutting the budget. tax increases are what politicians do instead of reforming government. as long as tax increases are on the table, the politicians never even think about reforming government. >> i understand you've been on this fight for a long time and you've been devoted to the whole idea of not seeing taxes increase anywhere. what we're down to is largely a political battle over the increase in marginal tax rates based on what you earn. i understand there's a lot more to this puzzle. but on that front, because that's the one that gets most of the ink around here. it's the whether people who earn more than 250,000 or 2z 400,000 or a million should pay more tax. the point i'm trying to get at is that's not going to hurt the economy. that's all we're talking about. paying 4.6 percentage points higher on your income over 250,000, the evidence isn't there that that's going to hurt the economy. >> it will take t
and there will also be spending cuts to government programs as well as the military and that will be spread over with 2013 and the world doesn't come to an end if we go over this quote, unquote, fiscal cliff and instead, a lot of the damage gets spread out and congress does have the power to go back and fix things. >> is it more important that the payroll tax holiday will go away and that is another thing that will end up happening. >> the payroll tax holiday will be a temporary sting, and it was crafted in 2010 and that is right in the waning days of the 111th congress when they still held in control the house of representatives and all of the counter proposals and counter proposals, and house speaker john boehner and the offers we have on the table don't deal with the payroll tax holiday and they go up to people on the amount of money they put in the social security trust fund and that is your payroll tax and those will go up and pretty much regardless if we get a deal or we don't. >> mark murray from d.c., breaking it down for us and the senior editor, thank you, sir. >> as lawmakers in d.c.
a deep channel. >>> and america's population growth is slowing down. the government says it's due to lower birth rates during the economic recession and lower immigration numbers. as we start the new year, there will be 315 million people in the united states. the population, though, has grown less than .75% since 2010. so a slower rate of growth. still, 315 million people is -- >> seems like enough people in some places, that's for sure. thanks, lisa. >>> hopes have been crushed and families in the making ripped apart. a new law bans americans from adopting russian children. ng tom about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. >>> from what we surmise, this meeting at the white house between the presiden
questions. the pentagon and all the other government agencies told their employees that they're not going to do anything with the sequester in january, because they're assuming congress will get its act together in january, february or so. so the idea that the markets are going to panic over this, you know, i think is a red herring. who knows? maybe they tank tomorrow. maybe they go through the roof. but i don't see that happening. though if it did that would drive things a little bit. >> do you have any sense they're feeling pressure from constituents at all? i would describe this as people are profoundly unhappy. >> that's a great point. congress' approval ratings are abysmal. but the pressure from the right for conservatives to cut a good deal, all this discussion about chained cpi is confusion. basically it means that republicans want to include entitlement reform as part of a deal. but why did they take that off the table? because when the debt ceiling comes next year, they can have a bigger fight about entitlement reform. so the big story today is that republicans are starting to re
this is a broader issue about western democracy. unless the markets do put governments under pressure, it's not easy to come up with such tough positions and i suspect that is going to be the case. it will be a recurring theme through the year, i suspect. >> and that's what i was going to suggest, this idea that we're going to come up with cliff after cliff after cliff, that maybe we're into a whole year of cliff diving, your expectation, let's say we get through the cliff with a baby deal. we've had still a number of economists come on this set and talk about how we could still be -- maybe not in a recession, but continue to see a slowdown. >> well, the other way i've been trying to think about the past 24 hours, you look at the private sector, there are two sources of great encouragement for the u.s. economy, it seems to me. one is the domestic housing story. and the second is, of course, the remarkable thing going on with energy based around shale, gas and oil. if these two sources of strength persist, you know, is the disappointment about the cliff enough to negate those two things? i suspect th
,000 a year would pay an extra two grand or so to the government. gregg: the big question, do lawmakers hope to get anything out of the last minute fiscal cliff talks or is it just for show? democratic congressman chris van hollen is the ranking member of the house budget committee. he will be joining us live coming up in the next hour what he really thinks is going on. patti ann: well the u.s. economy meanwhile could suffer yet another major blow. looming strikes at ports from next sass to boston are threatening to put thousands of americans out of work. with potential losses for u.s. businesses ranging in the billions. >> the port of baltimore is one of maryland's largest economic generators. any type of work action that may result in a suspension or stoppage of work would have an adverse effect. >> we handle more cars, we handle more farm and construction equipment than any other u.s. port. patti ann: we're learning that adverse effect could take a toll on the economy. fox business network's stuart varney has more for us on that this morning. good morning, stu. >> good morning, patti ann.
serve to, "embarrass the administration, destroy the energy of government, and substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices of an insignificant, turbulent, or corrupt junta to the regular deliberations and decisions of a respectable majority." good writer, that hamilton. but in recent years, the senate has been remade into a super majority constitution. disturb institution. you need 60 votes to get almost anything done. between 2009 and 2010, we had more filibusters than we had in the '50s, '60s, and '70s combined. and they're not filibusters like we think of them, where the senators go to the floor and debate an issue until they keel over from exhaustion. they're just obstruction. if you watch a filibuster today, it doesn't look like anything. it's the blue screen on c-span, the one with the classical music playing over it. you don't tune in to here an intense minority demand a great debate on the issue of the day. you tune in to hear a string quartet. senator jeff merkley, a democrat from oregon is trying to change that. he's got a proposal to force talking filibusters in the senate
brings. today, we gather in this hallowed temple to representative government dedicated to the enjoyment of life and its blessings by its citizens, to honor aung san suu kyi. we are honored by her presence and her heroic witness to the dignity of each person, most especially in her native land of burma. her story is known to all, her example among the greatest of our time, of all time. we ask that as we come together to honor her, you bless our gathering. may we all be emboldened to give of our life as she has done, to stand up for human freedom wherever it may be denied. and bless her most noble of causes. move the hearts of those who would deny freedom to her and to the people of burma. may our actions today add to the universal out cry for justice and freedom so that the blessings of life will burst forth for the citizens of aung san suu kyi's need of burma. -- native burma. god bless the nation of burma and bless the united states of america. amen. >> please be seated. >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable joseph crowley, representative of the seventh district of new york. >> thank
relatives, nobody's safe in the city anymore. we don't really see the government picking up that as an issue. i mean safety is the first thing that you would assure to a citizen, right? >> reporter: this isn't the first time a rape case has been reported. but many more never are, but this case has become a lightning rod in india. dissolution with the government -- protesters say enough is enough. >> the brutality of this crime and the way it has been handled kind of insensitive treatment that some of the statements that some of the politicians and some of the people have made ensure that not only me -- i mean everybody has come out to see that this is not done and we are not okay with this. >> they want to see the government take concrete steps to address their concerns. >> surely, definitely. then you know, just faster justice systems. you need to have special courts when it's not open to the public. i think that's still a provision, but you need to have more courts and better hearing and stronger systems. >> reporter: it's no longer about one girl or one particular rape case. it's about in
the deficit, not new government spending. shannon? >> how confident are the "cook's essentialsal" democrats about the ability to get this done? >> reporter: congressional democrats do not sound over confident. they recognize this is a heavy lift between the top two senators in the next couple of hours. but a leading new york democrat sounded cautiously optimistic. >> there is certainly no breakthroughs yet between senator mcconnell and senator reid. but there is a real possibility of a deal. i have been a legislator for 37 years. and i have watched how these things work. they almost always happen at the last minute. >> reporter: we are getting down to the left minute. the threshold for extending the bush tax cuts. president obama campaigned campn capping it at $250,000, raising taxes on those who earn more than $250k, but some of the discussion and it is buzz around capitol hill has been about perhaps going to the $400,000 mark. the question is, will you get enough republicans to buy in if that is the deal? shannon? >> thanks to mike on capitol hill. we will continue to check in. now to ed
for them to be a governing party in any way, particularly in the house of representatives. they are an oppositional party there. but it makes it impossible for john boehner to govern in any effective way to make any sort of negotiation with the president to avoid a fiscal cliff. and the larger issue is that the national populous as a whole wants to see congress get stuff done. they want the accomplishments. so it works for republicans in some statewide races, mostly not but it's not a national agenda. >> allow me to reintroduce myself as a tea party spokesperson. what they say is they are a governing party. you said they're not. they say they are a governing party and they right now are causing the government to completely rewire the way that it deals with the deficit. and they say that there is pain in that process. but the long-term debate and the reason why they don't need to be inside the meeting room is they've got so many of the people in that room afraid of them that we are having a debate between how much to cut the deficit and not to do jobs or stimulus and the th
. but if the bill never arrives, what incentive do people have to stop spending? big government is great if you don't have to pay for it. well, now it's time to pay for the bill. maybe when the costs of the stimulus, the obamacare and exploding entitlements are finally deducted from their pay much checks americans will rediscover the virtue of smaller government." doesn't he have a point if we have expanded the size of government so much under president bush and president obama, isn't it time to see somebody pay higher taxes? >> well, the way to economic recovery and growth is not by raising tax rates on the very people that employ the workers you want to keep working. raising taxes is not going to provide the kind of growth that we need in the country to lift the people in the middle income and lower income brackets higher and to provide the capital that's necessary to invest in the markets to hire more people. that's why both senator schumer and i are committed to trying to resolve this cliff problem because -- yes, it would be a very difficult thing and if you want to go back into a recession an
rates are way below normal, so when they spike, which they inevitably will, and the government is borrowing very short term to keep its costs down, the deficit is going to swamp the economy. and at that point you're going to have the debt crisis, and you're going to need a whole new stream of revenues. the only thing that paul krugman and paul ryan agree on, in a crisis situation, only a value-added tax will solve this problem. by raising marginal tax rates to get us out of this potential crisis. so we need very, very steep spending cuts, all of the emphasis and debate has been over marginal tax rates which are really a minor part of the solution, no matter what political strife you happen to be. you have to realize that tremendous spending cuts are necessary and already the -- any changes to social security have been ruled out in a short-term solution and it's going to be very difficult, congressman from oklahoma was correct, it's going to be hand-to-hand combat in the next session to get any cuts. no one is talking about major cuts except some on the republican side. >> i hea
down the deficit? if you are going to use it for more government spending we don't want a part of it. senator mcconnell on the republican side seemed to get frustrated because he felt like the democrats were slow walking the th, 18 hours without a response. mcconnell made a call to a well known senator, joe biden to see if he could help. >> we're willing to work with whoever can help. no single issue remains an impossible sticking point. a sticking point appears to be a willingness and interest or frankly the courage to close the deal. >> reporter: as senate aide says it was designed to try to jumpstart the talks and consequences of getting a tax increase is a huge concern. >> gregg: what went awry in these talks? >> you heard senator thune. a fiscal cliff deal is a new way calculating inflation that would lower social security payments. democrats say they would do it as part of much bigger deal but it was off the table for the smaller deal they are working on. so democrats called it a poison pill. >> at some point, negotiating process, it appears there are things that stopped us fro
in western syria. witnesses say a government warplane dropped bombs on a bakery today where long lines of people were waiting just to get some bread. more than 100 people are dead now. i want to talk to cnn's mohammed j j jamjoon. >> reporter: it's horrific details that have emerged the past few hours since we first reported this bombing. activists tell us that around 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. local in syria today that this warplane dropped this shell on this bakery. they say that hundreds of people were lined up outside, that there had been shortages of food throughout the last week. this was the first day that that bakery that had been hit was open and that because of that, at least 100 people they say were killed. the video that we've seen posted online, we can't independently verify it, but it seems to be corroborated by what we've been told by activists. it shows an absolutely grisly scene, mangled bodies in the wreckage of the building and the rubble. you see rebel free syrian army soldiers and civilians trying to tend to the wounded, taking them to the hospital and pulling dead bodies o
-- it will not be any more government bonds because we will be out of the debt situation. we saw it on the horizon. when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back on rates across the board to the wealthiest to the middle to the poor and he put to ban all wars on a credit card and we are where we are -- to banwo isa credit card and here we are. we are coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult -- led by unfortunately some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury secretary paulson, can you please explain the role of derivative ofs to me and what happened and how we got into this crisis? he put his head in his hands and he said, not now, i will talk to you later. that is not a very encouraging thing when the secretary of the treasury puts his head in his hands and says, i cannot explain it now. we are coming out of this difficult time and, guess what, we are doing much better. we had an election. it was pretty clear people want to see us reach a balance here. so, as i stand here, i k
a archaic 1947 law, unless the new bill is passed by december 31st, the government will be forced to buy vast quantities of milk at twice the wholesale rate. two bills are in congress. the senate passed one for $23 billion in savings. the house is looking to enact 35 billion. the sticking point the full house of representatives hasn't approved the bill. >> the farm bill is like this low hanging ornament on the congressional christmas tree that if they just embrace it, they can automatically come up with tens of billions of dollars in budget savings. and then they can figure out where else they need to cut spending after that. >> reporter: the secretary of agriculture tom vilsack has said his department is preparing a case the permanent law comes into effect. temporary solution is to attach a farm bill extension to the fiscal cliff legislation. harris? harris: is there anything besides milk we need to be aware of? are we looking potentially at higher prices among many farming commodities for example? >> reporter: yeah. it is not just the cows. it is the crops too. it is possibility the go
to significantly reduce government spending by this time, midnight tonight, then there would be this draconian and indiscriminate cut across the board, 50% of it, $500 billion over ten years in defense, $500 billion over ten years in other social spending, including social safety net programs. everyone was going to feel a little pain. the trouble is now some elements, particularly in the senate, are trying to delay that, put that off, one month, two months, three months, even a year by some estimations, and a lot of folks, particularly republicans in the house, say no way, we're not going for that. we're getting nothing out of this in terms of spending cuts except the sequestration. a lot of ironies here. it was house republicans who literally blamed the president for coming up with the sequestration idea to begin with. they've spent months blaming him. what you saw mitch mcconnell do on the senate floor, fascinating, chris, on the surface. he came out after the president gave that upbeat, cheery, he was joking with all the attendees there in the white house complex about being close to a deal
the nation's problems, to do what we sent you to washington to do, which is to govern, and here we are with a countdown clock at the bottom, ten hours, 51 minutes, and 34 seconds to get something done that should have gotten done, could have gotten done months ago. a lot of people are scratching their heads wishing, hoping that, you know, at some point congress will get et cetera act together. we do have a new congress coming back in. we keep talking about the so-called fiscal cliff. there are consequences for inaction if that countdown clock gets to zero and there's no deal and no deal has been reached. >> jonathan, thank you. to your point, it's remarkable to me that what we're debating is exactly what we were debating six months ago. it's not as though something has happened recently. this is the debate we've been having or the debate we haven't been having making it all the more remarkable that we have a countdown clock for it. thank you. >> that's right. >> a deal on the fiscal cliff may be at hand, but there's still a lot to do, and not a lot of time to do it. delaware democr
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